May. 16th, 2017

jeb124: (Default)
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gen-is-gone:

derinthemadscientist:

bakerstreetcrow:

derinthemadscientist:

cineastette:

i know we’re all up in arms about the fyre festival, but as we speak, a hacker going by the name of The Dark Lord has secured season 5 of Orange is the New Black and is now blackmailing Netflix for “a modest ransom” and quite frankly i have never heard anything more hilarious in my life, like honestly, what is this day????

If this is your kind of hilarious then my friend you need to spend some time with the Doctor Who fandom

There are rich people entering war-torn countries and risking being kidnapped to retrieve rare Doctor Who footage, dudes threatening to release or destroy footage if they’re not given money or if the BBC doesn’t cater to their specific demands for plot and director choices, long arguments about whether somebody actually has recovered footage or is just bluffing that can go on for far longer than you would reasonably expect such a thing to be in question…

O.o you have got to be kidding.  Seriously!?

Television has two cultural ancestors: radio and theatre. When television was first introduced, it was viewed in this light; as visual radio, or as theatre that you could see at home. The repeatability that we take for granted these days wasn’t really considered a feature of the medium.

Thus, things weren’t really kept. Film would be made, circulated and shown at various locations around the world, and then, unless there was a reason to keep it, it would usually be destroyed, because the BBC only had so much warehouse space. This means that a lot of early Doctor Who just doesn’t exist any more; there’s no footage of it anywhere. Fans have poured years into recreating old episodes from photographs, snatches of footage, and bits of script. 

Actual footage comes from two sources: the first is old videos recorded by fans who were rich enough to afford tapes at the time. Tapes were expensive and low-quality, but there was a pretty competitive underground trade for them at the time, the value of a tape depending on its rarity, the episode, and the tape generation (first-generation tapes were usually legible, but if you taped from a first-generation to make a second-generation, it would be less so; by about the fourth or fifth generation you could be reading a printed script to determine what the vague blurs on screen were doing). Magnetic tape, unfortunately, has a pretty short lifespan, so most tape footage has perished now unless it’s been moved to a hardier medium in time.

The second source is any film canisters that happened to escape destruction. The BBC has quite a bit, which is why you can find remastered versions of old stories, but there’s still an awful lot missing. Thing is, these canisters were sent all around the world so that Doctor Who could be aired in different countries, and some of these tapes ended up in warehouses in other countries and never made it back to the BBC to be destroyed. Best way to have a lot of chaos that results in warehouses of film being forgotten about? War. Old war zones are gold mines for found BBC footage. So these days you have fans who fund expeditions to find and buy the contents of these warehouses in the hopes that intact, otherwise nonexistent Doctor Who footage might be in there, and legions of fans who follow these journeys and assist in building timelines and tracking where such canisters are likely to be. Somebody able to find such footage, either in a warehouse or on a miraculously intact tape in their grandmother’s attic, has something quite valuable to the fandom, and the debate of ‘returning the investment and rewarding the risk of the founder’ versus ‘saving as much footage as possible by disseminating it to the public for multiple sources of redundant digital recording’ begins. And rages for months. Or years.

Basically the point here is that the Doctor Who fandom is scary as all hell and we should not stand between them and their relics. They are a tenacious people.

You can just say Ian Levine, we won’t judge
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jeb124: (Default)
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withoutpassionwedbetrulydead:

best-buffy-lines:

Graduation Day: Part One, 3.21

This has always been one of my favorite “fuck you” moments of all time. It always stuck with me when I was a kid. It is just so savage and genuine and powerful.
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vampireapologist:

vampireapologist:

vampireapologist:

wait do those tin can phones really work?? I thought this was all a myth.

I just looked up a video this is wild I’m making one tomorrow

in my high school Art 4 class while we were no doubt supposed to be getting ready for a Very important Art Show, two of my friends made one of these phones but instead of talking into it they would write messages and clip it to the string and slide it across the string to the other and when the art teacher asked why they said “we’re texting” and she could not BELIEVE it, this was the FUNNIEST thing she’d heard all year
so she got on her office phone and called the principal and said “two girls are texting in my classroom I need you to come take their phones and issue them detentions” and we all waited like assholes for him to show up and when he asked where they were she gestured at my friends “texting” on their tin can phone and my principal was already a pretty tired dude but that was the most exhausted I think he ever looked.
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May. 16th, 2017 01:46 am
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